Osteopathy- what do osteopaths do and can they help me?

(Please note, this article is taken directly from the institute of osteopathy website.)

Today’s society places ever increasing demands on our time. With the pressures of juggling a career, domestic tasks, managing the finances, and caring for those we love, it can be difficult to concentrate on our own health. It is often only when our health begins to suffers and our body starts to send out alarm signals forcing us to slow down that we truly begin to focus on ourselves.

However, by making sometime for yourself every day, to eat healthily, exercise and focus on your inner wellbeing, you will ultimately reduce your risk of developing a variety of serious health conditions. Not only will this benefit your health long-term, but by spending time on you, you will be ensuring that you continue to be there for those you love for years to come.

Osteopathy is a method of assessing and treating a wide range of health problems. Osteopaths use a combination of movement, stretching, targeted deep tissue massage and manipulation of a person’s muscles and joints to improve function, relieve pain and aid recovery.

Osteopaths are commonly known for treating back pain and postural problems including changes due to pregnancy, caused by driving or work strain, the pain of arthritis and minor sports injuries.

Osteopathic patients include the young, older people, manual workers, office professionals, pregnant women, children and sports people.

The body has the natural ability to maintain itself and, by helping this process, an osteopath can promote restoration of normal function. The principle of osteopathy is that the wellbeing of an individual relies on the way that bones, muscles, ligaments, connective tissue and internal structures work with each other.

An osteopath will take the time to understand their patient, and their unique combination of symptoms, medical history and lifestyle. This helps to make an accurate diagnosis of the causes of the pain or lack of function (rather than just addressing the site of the condition), and from that, to formulate a treatment plan that will achieve the best outcome.

Osteopaths frequently work alongside other health professionals, such as GPs, nurses and midwives as well as alternative medical practitioners. Osteopathy works well to complement other medical interventions including surgery and prescribed medication.

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) advises that GPs can safely refer patients to an osteopath for treatment. Osteopathy is available on the NHS in some areas of the UK.

Safety and Regulation

Osteopaths are regulated by the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC). It is against the law to call yourself an osteopath unless you are qualified and registered with the GOsC. The minimum qualification for an osteopath is completion of a four or five year degree, which includes at least 1000 hours of supervised clinical practice. Many osteopaths also study for masters degrees. They must then continue to update and expand their knowledge by logging a minimum of 30 hours per year of continuing professional development. GOsC can remove an osteopath from the register if they fail to maintain a strict code of professional practice. You can check whether an osteopath is registered by visiting the GOsC website.

Osteopathy is very safe. It is estimated that between 1 in 50,000 and 1 in 100,000 patients will suffer a reaction to osteopathic treatment that is serious enough to require further medical treatment or does not resolve within 48 hours.

Conditions treated by osteopaths

Although osteopaths are well known for treating back pain, the practice of osteopathy can help relieve the symptoms of a wide range of conditions. Osteopaths treat joint pain, neuromuscular conditions, digestive conditions, headaches and migraine prevention.


To find out more about osteopathy, please click here worthingosteopathy.com